Aquatic Invasive Alien Species in Southeast Asia (AIASSEA) Symposium

National University of Singapore, Singapore        26–27 July 2017

PLENARY SPEAKERS

Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom

 

Jaimie Dick is Professor of Invasion Ecology at Queen’s University Belfast, and Director of the Queen’s Marine Laboratory, Portaferry. Jaimie was Director of the Quercus Biodiversity and Conservation Centre. Jaimie uses classical ecological concepts and techniques to elucidate mechanisms of ecological impact of invasive species across taxonomic and trophic groups.

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR China

 

David Dudgeon is Chair Professor of Ecology & Biodiversity and Director of the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Hong Kong.  There, he researches and writes about the streams and rivers of monsoonal East Asia, and the animals that live in and around them.  Dudgeon is Editor-in-Chief of Freshwater Biology.

 

University of Windsor, Canada

 

Hugh MacIsaac is a senior Canada Research Chair in Aquatic Invasive Species at the University of Windsor.  He was Director of the Canadian Aquatic Invasive Species networks, which conducted invasive research in freshwater and marine ecosystems across Canada.  Hugh is interested in vectors that transmit invasive species, and the issues of false positives and false negatives in invasive species research.

Murdoch University, Australia

 

Fred Wells is an Adjunct Professor at Murdoch University in Perth. He was the President of Unitas Malacologica and Senior Curator (Malacology) at the Western Australian Museum where he has examined distributional patterns of molluscs in the western third of the continent and placed this in a broader geographical context. Much of the work involved documentation of molluscan assemblages in areas not previously investigated by scientists, not only in Western Australia, but in biogeographically related areas. His research has included all major habitat types in Western Australia, with a particular focus on coral reefs and mangroves.